Get moving to keep your *girls* healthy!

 

 

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Studies show that one of the best ways to keep your breasts (and your heart and brain) healthy is to keep physically active. As an added benefit – your butt will look better than ever too!

While there isn’t a one-size-fits-all recommendation for the amount of exercise you need, one thing is for sure – the more you move, the better off you are.

How does physical activity work to reduce breast cancer? Well, regular exercise helps you maintain a healthy weight, which helps balance your hormones and boost your immune system; strengthening your ability to fight off all kinds of illnesses!

Here are some tips to get you moving !

The American Cancer Society says all adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each week, preferably spread throughout the week. Examples of moderate exercise include brisk walks, golfing, dancing, gardening, yoga, and leisurely bicycling. Some examples of vigorous exercise are jogging, running, swimming, aerobic dance, soccer, basketball, and fast bicycling.

If you’ve never exercised before, start small. 15 minutes a day for 2 weeks, then double that for the next two and so on. It’s better to get small amounts of exercise several times a day, instead of all at once.

Studies show that moving throughout the day decreases your chances of developing breast cancer. The muscle activity needed for standing and other movement triggers the breakdown of fats and sugars within the body. When you sit, these processes stall — increasing your health risks. When you’re standing or actively moving, you kick these processes back into action.

If you have a sedentary job, not to worry – there are so many things you can do to keep healthy! Here are some ideas:

  1. Ask for a standing desk, if that’s an option.
  2. Limit your screen-time during off-work hours.
  3. Exercise in place while you watch TV (treadmill, stationary bike, aerobics, resistance bands, mini-trampoline).
  4. Try walking or biking whenever possible.
  5. Take the stairs instead of the elevator.
  6. Make your lunch break an active one (ie. go for a walk with co-workers).
  7. Take short exercise breaks (2-3 walks throughout the day, 15 minutes at a time).
  8. Walk over to your coworkers instead of emailing them.
  9. Wear a pedometer to keep track of your movement throughout the day, and plan on increasing your number of daily steps.
  10. Join a sports team, hiking group, or dance class.
  11. Sign up for a 5K walk/ run.

Remember, we’re not aiming for perfection here. Every little bit counts… so let’s keep it moving – your *girls* (and your butt) will thank you!

 

All written contents are copyright 2017 by 20fourcarrots.

 [https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

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Cheers with a mocktail!

 

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No doubt about it, society sees drinking as a way to loosen up, wash your worries away, and socialize. Now that you know even small amounts of alcohol intake can increase your risk of breast cancer, you may feel inspired to cut down your alcohol intake or eliminate it entirely. These tips will help you recognize-avoid-cope in social situations.

  • Every success starts with a SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Timebound) plan.

Goal setting really helps increase your chances of achieving success. Planning your resistance strategies using this form is a great place to start. Since you know yourself better than anyone, be sure to start with small, realistic changes and then build from there. For example, if you’re currently having 3 alcoholic drinks per week, you may want to start with a plan to reduce that number to 2 drinks per week. If you’re feeling especially ambitious, consider adding 15 minutes of daily moderate-vigorous exercise! Start at your current comfort level. You can read more about designing SMART goals by clicking here.

  • Think of a situation where you may find yourself being offered a drink. How would you refuse it? Practice makes perfect – take your resistance strategies form (above) for a few trial runs!

Pressures to drink come from all kinds of places – some are direct (friends and co-workers) and others indirect (temptation by being around others who drink).

  1. Learn to recognize the type of pressure . Then, for each situation, choose som resistance strategies.
  2. Whenever possible,avoiding situations that tempt you to drink is a good strategy. Once you’ve got the hang of saying ‘no’, you’re less likely to have to avoid these events in the future.
  3. If you can’t avoid a situation, planning your clear, firm, and friendly ‘no’ is important. Keep it short and sweet, and make eye contact.
  4. Have a non-alcoholic drink in a cocktail glass.
  5. Ask for support from your peers in social situations (sometimes, this can be difficult).

Remember, it’s your choice!

Recognizing your decision to change as an empowering choice increases your likelihood of success. *You* are the one in charge here.

How others will react or view you is out of your control, and you deserve to have your life choices respected.

All written contents are copyright 2017 by 20fourcarrots.

 [https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Evidence is in: Alcohol Intake Increases Your Risk of Breast Cancer

The link between breast cancer and alcohol is well-established. With every drink you consume, your risk increases. Compared with non-drinkers, women who have 1 alcoholic drink a day have a slight increase in risk. Those who have 2 or 3 drinks a day are increasing their risk by about 20%.

The American Cancer Society recommends that women who drink have no more than 1 drink a day. If you don’t drink, you may think twice about starting now.

Until recently, breast cancer awareness campaigns mostly focused on early screening and detection (both *very* important). Still, a recent survey of 19,000 Avon employees across the globe revealing a huge gap in knowledge regarding preventive lifestyle habits shows that more can be done.

Got questions? See if we’ve answered them below:

Q: I keep hearing that drinking a glass of wine daily is healthy for my heart… is it true?

A: While it’s true that the resveratrol in wine is heart-healthy, all alcoholic beverages have been shown to have a very strong link to breast cancer – manifesting particularly in women during perimenopause and menopause.

Evidence shows that vigorous exercise is a much more effective way to keep your heart healthy. As an added bonus, it’s good for breast and brain health too!  A review of 31 studies showed that physical activity could significantly reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Q: Why is my risk of developing breast cancer higher during perimenopause and menopause?

A: All the different things that can increase the risk of breast cancer have one thing in common: they all affect the hormones circulating around in the body in some way. Alcohol consumption and menopause can both increase levels of circulating hormones in the body, including estrogen. High levels of estrogen have been shown to fuel the development of breast cancer.

Since both early-life (before first pregnancy) alcohol consumption and recent alcohol consumption seem to contribute to breast cancer in adult women, it’s never too early to start limiting your alcohol intake.

Q: So, how many drinks can I have?

A: Studies show that even small amounts of alcohol (≤1 drink/day or ≤12.5 g/day) can significantly increase your risk.

To put this all this into perspective, in the United States, a standard drink contains about 14 grams of alcohol. This corresponds to a 12-US-fluid-ounce (350 ml) glass of beer, a 5-US-fluid-ounce (150 ml) glass of 12% wine, or a 1.5-US-fluid-ounce (44 ml) glass of spirits.

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Experts recommend either abstaining from alcohol altogether or strictly limiting your consumption. If you drink, consider taking several days off in between. Incorporating other lifestyle habits that show a preventive effect (ie. vigorous exercise) can also be useful.

Q: Every day the news seems to say something different. What kind of evidence is there to support the link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer?

A: Over time, studies have shown a consistent link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer in adult women. The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers alcohol intake causally related to breast cancer. In fact, breast cancer risk is significantly increased by 4–15% even with light alcohol consumption (≤1 drink/day or ≤12.5 g/day), which does not significantly increase cancer risk in other organs of women.

Click here for some tips on how to avoid the social pressures of drinking, and look out for alternative lifestyle tips for prevention – coming soon!

All written contents are copyright 2017 by 20fourcarrots.

 [https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

 

Frankincense for the body & soul

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I’ve been hearing a lot about essential oils lately – before yoga class, before meditation class, at the acupuncturist. To be honest, I was skeptical about the cure-all tone being used to market them, until I started doing some investigating of my own. Since then, I’ve become increasingly impressed by their wide range of healing properties – time-tested for millennia.

When essences are extracted from plants in natural ways (steam, water, or mechanically pressed), they become essential oils. Because essential oils are *super* concentrated, they’re usually blended into a carrier oil like jojoba, coconut, or argan to help prevent any potential contact irritation. To give you an idea of just how concentrated… it takes more than 200 pounds of lavender flowers to make only 1 pound of essential oil! This is one of the reasons that high quality oils are so expensive.

I’ll be focusing on frankincense today. Also known as Boswellia or olibanum, it comes from the dried sap of the Boswellia tree native to Africa, India, and the Middle East [R]. The 4 main types of Boswellia that produce authentic frankincense are B. sacra (also known as B. carteri and B. bhaw-dajiana), B. frereanaB. papyrifera, and B. serrata. 

Frankincense essential oil can be used topically, orally, or diffused into the air, and has been safely used for inflammatory conditions for thousands of years in Ayurvedic medicine. Frankincense also has a long history of use in many religions, in the ritual cleansing and purification of sacred spaces. In fact, frankincense is now recognized as having antiseptic and disinfectant properties! Modern research is (finally!) catching up to the ancient wisdom of folk medicine, confirming many of its traditional uses in inflammatory conditions [R] [R] ranging from headaches to arthritis [R] [R], and even cancer [R] [R].

What to look for:

  • Since there are no official regulatory guidelines for essential oils, it is important to ask questions about the sourcing, time of harvest, extraction method, food grade or not, organic or not. The words “therapeutic grade” alone carry very little meaning.
  • Longer duration and higher temperature hydro-distillation methods produce a richer, more potent oil rich in boswellic acids (one of its main active ingredients).
  • Sustainably harvested. Over-exploitation has resulted in a decline in tree populations [R] – just a couple of drops at a time is usually all you need! Remember, plants are our teachers. We need them for medicine, and we look to their inherent wisdom when developing new medicines (among a million other reasons)… please please use wisely!  (I like Young Living and Snow Lotus brands – and I’m not getting paid to say this!)
  • If taking orally as a capsule, tablet, or bark decoction, look for a standardized extract (containing 60% boswellic acids). Try sustainably harvested Savesta (again, I’m not being paid to say this!)

How-to’s

3 drops high-quality essential oil per 100ml of water in a diffuser. This is an especially eco-conscious (and the most bang-for-your-buck) way to receive the benefits of essential oils!

For depression or anxiety, try 1 drop of a food-grade essential oil under the tongue in the morning. Note: high doses of frankincense can be toxic.

In capsule or tablet form, the suggested dosage for inflammatory or asthmatic conditions is 300-400 mg three times daily, taken with a fatty meal to aid absorption [R].

What it’s good for

Autoimmune issues/ chronic inflammation – preliminary studies have shown that Boswellia can help improve autoimmune conditions without the negative side effects associated with conventional medicines [R] .

Mood disorders – One study showed that mice who were given frankincense resin orally became less depressed – with reduced stress hormone levels and increased levels of neurotropic proteins that support a healthy nervous system [R].

Brain health – many studies point to the cognitive benefits of frankincense: from short and longer term memory to learning ability [R]

Asthma – A study of patients using traditional corticosteroid therapy showed a decreased need for inhalation therapy when combined with a daily oral intake of 500mg of a Boswellia extract [R] .

Environmental allergies (year-round) – subjects involved in a study using a blend of Ravensara, frankincense, and sandalwood oils inhaled for 5 minutes, twice a day for a week showed a significant improvement in their symptoms [R].

Gingivitis – A 2-week study showed significant improvements among subjects given small doses of frankincense powder or extract – improvements included reduced gum bleeding and inflammation [R] .

All written contents are copyright 2017 by 20fourcarrots.

 [https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian], [https://www.facebook.com/20fourcarrots]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

Food for Thought

 

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The idea of using food as medicine has always fascinated me thanks to my dad, who’s used it to naturally heal so many things over the years. I used to giggle when I’d see him dab a little distilled vinegar around his nostrils (OK, I still do) to keep germs at bay… but as I write this today, I’d like to raise a toast to my 80 years young and vibrant dad (*touch wood*)!!  Clearly, he knew what he was doing all these years.

Over time, I’ve personally been called to seek natural ways to get and stay healthy. And I’ve made it my mission to share this information with everyone I can – with the goal of prevention first. Oftentimes, there are natural alternatives that doctors may not know about. And I believe each and every one of us has a right to choose – knowledge is potential power.

When my grandmother developed Alzheimer’s shortly after the death of my grandfather, it wasn’t yet known that diet/exercise and lifestyle could play such a large preventive role. I recall one of the things she would cook the most at that time: white rice with raisins. She also became very depressed. To this day, my mom still says that grandma died of a broken heart. All she wished for after my grandpa was gone was for nighttime to come so she could go to sleep – the days suddenly seemed so long and lonely. Is it possible that a person could self-induce a sort of unconscious state to cope with trauma? I believe it is, and the studies are beginning to confirm this notion [3, 4]. Sometimes I wonder how I could have helped her if I had known some of the things I know today.

While diet is important, there are things we can do to “feed” our mind, body, and soul. Maintaining balance in all of these areas leads us to optimal health – this includes having a healthy brain. Please know that you can choose to include some or all of the items I’ve listed. Even the smallest of changes are helpful, and will contribute to your overall quality of life.

Let’s start with the easy stuff: nutrition. There is overwhelming evidence to show that fasting, intermittent fasting, high-intensity exercise training, and restricted calorie diets improve overall health [2, 7]. Studies also seem to point to neuroprotective benefits associated with a ketogenic diet or modified ketogenic diet [8, 9]. This means maintaining a diet that is high in fat, contains little carbs, and low-moderate amounts of protein (please consult with your physician). Limiting your sugar intake (this includes sugar from fruit) to no more than** [14]:

  • 9 teaspoons (38 grams) for men
  • 6 teaspoons (25 grams) for women
  • 6 teaspoons (25 grams) for toddlers and teens between the ages of 2 and 18
  • Zero added sugars for kids under the age of 2

** When it comes to sugar, less is better.

Coffee (at least 7 hours before bedtime) – If you don’t have anxiety, coffee is a great way to boost mood and energy, sharpen mental performance, and slow age-related mental decline.

Tea – If you do have anxiety, an organic tea may be a better choice. Tea provides many of the same benefits coffee does, without the accompanying anxiety. Tea contains theanine, which helps soften the effects of caffeine, boosts mood, and helps curb anxiety.  Black teas are higher in both caffeine and theanine. Just go with your favorite variety, whether that’s black, white, green, or oolong!

Supplements for brain health:

Turmeric – one of my favorite herbs for overall health (helps fight inflammation, and has so many other benefits – read more about it here)

Cognitex by Life Extension (a blend of adaptogenic, anti-inflammatory, and calming herbs – this comes with or without the hormone precursor pregnenolone, which can have a stimulating effect for some); take this supplement in the morning as directed.

Ginkgo Biloba [10]

Ashwagandha [11]

Resveratrol [13]

Lions Mane mushroom [12]

Shilajit (read more here)

 

(PS… your brain *loves* fat!!)

Walnuts – in homeopathic medicine, there is something called the law of signatures; meaning that a food that resembles a particular part of the body is likely to be beneficial for it. Modern science has begun to catch up with this theory, with recent studies showing that foods (like the walnut) that are rich in antioxidants, poly-unsaturated fats, and anti-inflammatory phytochemicals are the perfect “brain food” [15].

MCT – high quality MCT oil has concentrated amounts of the beneficial fatty acids lauric, capric, and caprylic; caprylic acid is the brain’s preferred form of energy. To avoid “disaster pants”, start with a teaspoon, and work your way up to 3-4 daily. I like to blend mine into a smoothie. Look for a sustainably sourced product.

Palm or Coconut oil – If you cannot find MCT oil, coconut oil is the next best option.* Again, look for a responsibly sourced product.

Fish oil

Lifestyle changes:

(PPS… your brain *loves* oxygen!!)

Vigorous exercise oxygenates the brain – Remember (and if you can’t, this will help with that!) : if it’s good for your heart, it’s good for your brain. Exercise improves brain function, and repairs damaged brain cells [6]. Try walking briskly for just a few minutes a day, gradually increasing this amount by five or 10 minutes every week until you’re up to at least half an hour on most days.

High intensity interval training (HIIT/ HIT) – Anaerobic exercise training is *excellent* for the brain [16] – likely superior to traditional/ aerobic exercise training, and a real time-saver. A form of interval training, it involves alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise (like sprinting) with less intense recovery periods (like jogging).

Inverting your legs above your heart daily increases circulation to the brain. Note: people with certain conditions should avoid inversions.

Meditation – helps calm an anxious, overstimulated mind. Helps sharpen concentration. Has also been shown to change the makeup of the brain, strengthening key areas related to learning, cognition, memory, emotional regulation, perspective taking, empathy, and compassion [5].

Social interaction – Scientific studies confirm that if you don’t use it, you lose it [17]. As human beings, we are hardwired to connect with one another. When we use different parts of our brain, they grow, change and become strengthened much like our muscles. Perhaps most importantly, we’re happier and less stressed.

References

1- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26677204

2- https://law.stanford.edu/2015/01/09/lawandbiosciences-2015-01-09-intermittent-fasting-try-this-at-home-for-brain-health/

3- http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/739654

4- https://www.livescience.com/13358-widowhood-raise-dementia-risk.html

5- https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2015/05/26/harvard-neuroscientist-meditation-not-only-reduces-stress-it-literally-changes-your-brain/?utm_term=.9c68e9b8dd81

6- https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/regular-exercise-changes-brain-improve-memory-thinking-skills-201404097110

7- http://www.johnshopkinshealthreview.com/issues/spring-summer-2016/articles/are-there-any-proven-benefits-to-fasting

8- https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/the-fat-fueled-brain-unnatural-or-advantageous/

9- http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-fat-burning-brain-what-are-the-cognitive-effects-of-ketosis/

10- http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/15/ginkgo-biloba-brain-benefits.aspx

11- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252722/

12- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3924982/

13- https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160727140041.htm

14- http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/07/recommended-sugar-intake.aspx

15- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24500933

16- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4640257/

17- https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/demystifying-psychiatry/201206/social-interactions-and-brain-cell-connections

Juice Rx for digestion

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If you suffer from acid reflux, GERD, or heartburn – this recipe’s custom-made for you… as an added bonus, it’s delicious too!

Ideally, this juice should be taken first thing in the morning on an empty stomach – 20 minutes before a meal.

(To emphasize certain flavors over others, try adding those ingredients at the end. For example, if you like a more pronounced ginger flavor, add in the ginger piece(s) last).

1/2 bulb of fennel

1 small English cucumber or 2-3 medium sized Persian cucumbers

1/2 small apple (any sweet variety)

1/2 small lemon* (keep the white part of the peel, remove the yellow rind)

2 celery stalks

1 inch piece of ginger

2 oz. aloe vera

*though lemon is an acidic fruit, it becomes alkaline in the body when consumed, helping to temper overactive stomach acid.

For in depth information on the many ways to naturally treat acid reflux, GERD, and heartburn, click here!

[All written contents are copyright 2017 by Vivian Kanchian], Holistic Nutrition Expert.

[https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

Homemade matcha latte

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I never fancied myself much of a matcha drinker. I didn’t love the chalky texture, and found it bitter in a way I didn’t enjoy.

Then, I discovered Shuhari Matcha Cafe and MatchaBar in Silverlake. I will always try something healthy more than once hoping to develop a liking for it (though I’ve given up trying with kombucha), so I strolled in and ordered up a latte over ice – and just like that, a new addiction was born!

Matcha Latte in a blender:

Ingredients

1.5 cups of milk (your choice – I love almond)

1 tsp matcha powder (shop around for a ceremonial-grade organic brand)

coconut sugar to taste (or black sugar, if you can find it)

Instructions

Heat milk to just under boiling (skip this step if you prefer it cold – I do!)

Pour milk into blender

Add Matcha powder to blender

Blend at lowest setting for 15 seconds until smooth and frothy

Health benefits of matcha:

-in animal studies, it shows a protective effect on damaged liver and kidney cells resulting from Type 2 diabetes by decreasing glucose, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and through its antioxidant activities.

-in a literature review of various studies on green tea, among which matcha is a standout with its higher levels of active ingredients, the following benefits were observed:

  • aids in weight loss
  • boosts immune health
  • anti-inflammatory properties help improve symptoms of arthritis (both rheumatoid and osteoarthritis)
  • has the potential to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s
  • has shown neuroprotective qualities that may be helpful in Parkinson’s
  • L-theanine (higher levels are found in black tea) helps us adapt better to stress, elevates mood
  • has been shown to prevent cavities, strengthen gums, and freshen breath
 Find out where your matcha comes from:
  • Visit the website of the company selling your matcha. The best matcha shops will post their quality standards and a certification of radiation testing results. You can also inquire as to what region it was grown, and look it up on a map to see how far it is from Fukushima.
  • If you are interested in digging through the most current data on radiation in Japan, Japan’s Ministry of Health continues to post updates weekly and monthly with testing results for levels of radioactive contaminants in tea.
  • Here’s an interactive map of radiation in Japan by region (this map is from April 2011, 1 month after the nuclear accident).

Click here to learn even more about green tea!

[All written contents are copyright 2017 by Vivian Kanchian], Holistic Nutrition Expert.

[https://twitter.com/VivianKanchian]

No reuse or re-publication without permission. Please note that the information provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only. Nothing contained herein is intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure any illness or medical condition. Consult a doctor before beginning any diet or exercise regimen or before taking vitamins or supplements. Statements on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

Broccoli “shot”

Anytime I’m making steamed broccoli, I make a broccoli “shot” for my honey to sip on until it’s time to eat!

Steaming vegetables for a short amount of time, in a very small amount of water (about 1″) is the best way to preserve nutrients, while breaking down cell walls that make them more digestible. Still, you may have noticed that your water takes on some of the color from your veggies with steaming, and that water contains precious vital nutrients that you don’t want to toss out!

What to do?

Pour into a small ceremonial Japanese tea cup, add half a capful of apple cider vinegar and a pinch of sea salt, and voila – say cheers to your good health!

 

(You can substitute with cauliflower, brussels sprouts, or a cruciferous vegetable of your choice!)

Beet your allergies with this salad!

Not only is this salad super simple, it is custom-designed to help you get rid of those pesky allergies!

(Another nice benefit: beets and garlic are two of the most detoxifying plant foods around!)

3-4 medium red beets

2 medium cloves garlic (minced)

Coarse sea salt (to taste)

1/4 cup unrefined extra virgin olive oil

1 T fresh lemon juice

1/4 bunch fresh parsley finely chopped

  • Cut the tops off the beets, leaving 1 inch of stems attached. Place in a pot of cold water to cover, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and boil until the beets can be pierced through with a sharp knife (still a bit al dente), about 45 minutes depending on their size.
  • Rinse in cold water until beets are cool enough to handle, then cut the stems off, and dice into bite-sized cubes, toss with olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and salt.
  • Top with chopped parsley.

 

I prefer this salad warm or at room temperature – watch as your sniffles, sneezes and runny nose begin to disappear! “Allergies, be gone”!